Location: Parkorman, Istanbul
Head of project: Oğuz Cankan
Collaborators: Oğuz Cankan, Salih Küçüktuna, Yasemin Arpaç, İlker Ali İliş, Kerem Türker
Structure: Gökhan Humbaracı
Electrics: Edi Tasarım
Photos by: Ali Bekman

Part of Fatih Forest in Maslak is open for public recreation, and within this section is an area known as Parkorman available for lease, where we undertook a project for Borusan Otomotiv. In this area encircled by high pine trees we created and produced a design for the rotational exhibition of cars and motorcycles for which Borusan is the distributor, and for educational events as well. Once the concept had been developed, the building was designed and constructed in just 45 days.
The siting and shape of the building were determined according to the position of the trees and the slant of the land. A little to the right, a little to the left and there you are, just the sort of thing we look for these days.

We did not consider a timber building in the middle of the forest. Instead we used earth-coloured rusted sheet metal and glazed surfaces which engender different outlooks from inside and out, so that the building emerges from the soil but simultaneously loses itself, adapting to the site like a chameleon. Visitors have suggested to us that this building, which has a total area of approximately 300 sqm, could be the prototype for a house flexible in size and shape. They begin to dream of having such a house themselves.

When we remember that the building took only 45 days to design and build, it drives home the unnecessary preoccupations of the construction sector. Architects get obsessed with style and builders lay down the law in the name of other people. Yet if alternative approaches are proposed, people are ready to accept them and to feel a sense of belonging. This is what I meant when in various articles and talks I said that “We should use design to communicate, not to persuade.” Such approaches should be capable of arousing new desires and excitement without being tied to styles and habits of nourishing architecture and broadening the boundaries of perception.

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